Articles Tagged with Cuba

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On November 8, 2017, the Department of Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”) and the Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (“BIS”) announced amendments to the Cuban Assets Control Regulations (“CACR”) and Export Administration Regulations (“EAR”). In addition, the State Department published a list of entities and subentities deemed to be under the control or to act on behalf of the Cuban military, intelligence, or security services or personnel. These steps implement the changes to the Cuba sanctions program announced by the President in his June “National Security Presidential Memorandum on Strengthening the Policy of the United States Toward Cuba” (“NSPM”). The changes reflect adjustments to the broader Cuba reform initiated by former President Obama in January 2015. A majority of the general license and guidance issued since that time remain in effect.

The key changes to the Cuba sanctions program are as follows:

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On June 16, 2017, President Trump issued a National Security Presidential Memorandum on Strengthening the Policy of the United States Toward Cuba, which begins a process to alter some aspects of U.S. policy towards Cuba, but retains much of the Obama Administration’s reforms to travel, business and trade with Cuba.

The signaled changes focus on limiting business with companies related to Cuba’s military, intelligence and security apparatus and tightening aspects of the administration of existing travel allowances. Existing business and travel arrangements affected by the changes may be grandfathered.

There are no immediate changes to U.S. sanctions or export control policy. The memorandum sets the framework for the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) and other agencies to consider regulatory changes in the coming months.

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Questions continue to swirl around the future of U.S.-Cuba policy as recent reports of a Trump Administration plan to strengthen Cuba sanctions surfaced over the weekend. These reports should be assessed against the backdrop of an increased Congressional effort to end the embargo on Cuba.

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Donald Trump’s victory in the 2016 Presidential election put the Republican Party in charge of the White House and Congress for the first time in a decade. President-elect Trump ran as an anti-establishment candidate who departed from many traditional Republican positions and promised bold and in some respects controversial reforms. How his administration will govern and the extent to which its policies will be supported in Congress are key questions facing companies and investors.

This report comments on aspects of international trade, sanctions and export control policies that are currently at the forefront of discussion.

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Both the U.S. Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) and the Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) have announced new amendments to the Cuban Assets Control Regulations (CACR) and Export Administration Regulations (EAR) that continue to build upon existing licenses and authorizations facilitating trade with Cuba.  These amendments, effective October 17, 2016, enhance the flexibility of U.S. companies seeking to do business with Cuba or Cuban nationals across various sectors.

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The Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) updated its FAQs for Cuba on April 21, 2016 with substantive guidance that addresses U-turn transactions, export policy, insurance, educational and humanitarian activities and leasing of property in Cuba.

U-Turn Rules. OFAC amended the Cuban Assets Control Regulations (CACR) on March 16, 2016 to permit funds transfers from a bank outside the United States that pass through U.S. financial institutions before being transferred to a bank outside the United States, where neither the originator nor the beneficiary is a person subject to U.S. jurisdiction (so called “U-turn transactions”).

  • FAQ 62 clarifies that this authorization allows transactions originating and terminating at accounts in foreign branches or non-U.S. subsidiaries of U.S. banks (which are subject to U.S. jurisdiction), so long as the account-holder is not.
  • FAQ 63 clarifies that U.S. banks may process U-turn transactions where the Cuban party is a Specially Designated National (SDN).

FAQ 63 also provides guidance for U.S. banks on the due diligence expected when processing Cuba U-turn transactions.  Where a U.S. bank is only an intermediary, it may rely on the information provided by the remitting and receiving banks to determine if the parties are persons subject to U.S. jurisdiction. Where the transfer involves a direct customer, OFAC expects more substantial customer due diligence. In either case, the bank should conduct screening. If a U.S. bank fails to identify and block a prohibited transaction, despite following this guidance, OFAC indicated it would consider the totality of the circumstances in determining how to enforce.

Export Clarifications. FAQ 67 addressed the licensing requirements for removal of items from Cuba for repair or servicing. For items previously exported to Cuba under an authorization, an import from Cuba to the U.S. or a third country for repair/servicing requires OFAC authorization, which will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Separate Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) authorization would be required for return of the items to Cuba after servicing where subject to the Export Administration Regulations (EAR). However, where the import back to the United States is required under the terms of BIS authorizations used for export/reexport to Cuba, no further OFAC specific license is necessary.

FAQ 68 clarifies that the authorization under section 515.533 of the CACR for persons subject to U.S. jurisdiction to engage in transactions incident to the reexport of 100 percent U.S.-origin items from a third country to Cuba where consistent with BIS licensing policy only applies where the items are 100 percent U.S.-origin.

Insurance. Transactions directly incident to authorized activity generally are permitted under the CACR, and OFAC clarified this authorization includes a variety of types of insurance for individuals traveling to Cuba and exports to Cuba (e.g. cargo or hull insurance).  Insurance companies also may pay or settle claims to Cuban nationals for insurance incident to authorized activities. Providing insurance is otherwise prohibited, including reinsurance for activities in Cuba by foreign parties not subject to U.S. jurisdiction. See FAQs 80 & 81.

Grants to State-Owned Entities. Cuban state-owned entities may be the recipients of certain grants authorized under sections 515.565 and 515.575 of the CACR for education, scholarships, awards and certain humanitarian projects designed to benefit the Cuban people. See FAQ 93.

Leasing of Real Property.  Persons subject to U.S. jurisdiction may lease real property in Cuba where they are authorized to travel to or reside in Cuba. This would include, for example, short-term leases of residences in lieu of hotels when on authorized travel, or the rental of apartments when employed by a business authorized to have a physical or business presence in Cuba. OFAC cautioned that the ability to lease is limited to the time the person is permitted to be in Cuba and real property rights may not be retained thereafter. See FAQ 97.

The updated FAQs are available at:

https://www.treasury.gov/resource-center/sanctions/Programs/Documents/cuba_faqs_new.pdf.

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On Friday, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) issued an order making it easier for US telecommunications companies seeking authority to provide services to Cuba. In its order, the FCC removed Cuba from what is known as the Exclusion List, which identifies countries that require separate licensing by the FCC. Typically, the FCC grants telecommunications carriers global authority to provide international services. The FCC action was based on guidance from the State Department, which had requested removal of Cuba from the Exclusion List. Cuba had been on the Exclusion List since the list was first established in 1996. The FCC stated that carriers with existing global Section 214 authority will be permitted to serve Cuba without additional authorization. 

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On July 22, 2015, the Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) released amendments to the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) implementing the Secretary of State’s May 29, 2015 decision to rescind the designation of Cuba as a State Sponsor of Terrorism. The removal of Cuba from Country Group E:1 and “AT” controls under the EAR requires a number of highly-technical changes to U.S. regulations. The key practical impacts are:

  •  The de minimis level for Cuba will be 25 percent instead of 10 percent (with some exceptions);
  •  License exception AVS will be expanded somewhat for aircraft on temporary sojourn in Cuba;
  • License exception RPL will be available to replace, on a one-for-one basis, parts, components, accessories or attachments for aircraft and other items controlled for national security reasons that were previously lawfully exported or reexported to Cuba; and
  • License exception BAG generally will allow travelers to Cuba to carry encryption commodities and software.

It is important to emphasize that the change to Cuba’s status as a state sponsor of terrorism does not remove the U.S. embargo on Cuba. Cuba remains in Country Group E:2, and any export, re-export, or transfer of goods, software or technology that are subject to the EAR to Cuba must still be licensed or be eligible for export under a license exception. Also, there have been no further changes to the U.S. sanctions policy administered by the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC).

Increase in De Minimis Amount of U.S. Content Allowed for Cuba

Under the de minimis exception of the EAR, foreign-made products incorporating “controlled” U.S. content – that is, items that would require a license if exported separately to the country of ultimate destination – below certain threshold amounts are not subject to the EAR.

Previously, foreign made products that incorporated more than 10% U.S.-origin content were subject to the EAR when exported to Cuba from third countries. The amendments increase the threshold de minimis level to 25%, consistent with the threshold applied to most other countries.

As a result of this change, non-U.S. companies may find it easier in some cases to export products to Cuba incorporating U.S.-origin content. Nonetheless, companies should be mindful of continuing U.S. sanctions rules when assessing de minimis eligibility. In particular, because all U.S. content is controlled for export to Cuba (even items classified under EAR99), products that satisfy the de minimis test for export to other countries may not qualify for export to Cuba under the de minimis exception. Also, several categories of items are not eligible for the de minimis exception, including items incorporating content classified as a “600 series” item.

Changes to License Exceptions

License Exception Aircraft, Vessels and Spacecraft (AVS)

License exception AVS (“Aircraft, Vessels and Spacecraft”) (EAR § 740.15) previously allowed non-Cuban airlines to operate flights into Cuba. The amended regulations remove some restrictions on the use of AVS for Cuba, but the modifications currently seem likely to have a limited impact until such time as export licensing requirements for sales of aircraft and aircraft parts to Cuba are relaxed.

License Exception Servicing and Replacement of Parts and Equipment (RPL)

Certain exports and re-exports to Cuba may now be eligible for License Exception “Servicing and Replacement of Parts and Equipment” (EAR § 740.10). This would allow one-for-one replacement of parts, components, accessories, and attachments to be exported or re-exported to Cuba for aircraft; as well as for commodities controlled for national security (NS) reasons. Note that this license exception may only be used for items previously lawfully exported or reexported to Cuba.

License Exception Baggage (BAG)

License Exception “Baggage” (BAG) (EAR § 740.14) was previously available for Cuba. The amendments have the effect of now authorizing travellers to carry in their baggage encryption items (e.g., laptops containing encryption software) for their own use.

Before using any of the above license exception, it is important to review all of the specific requirements under EAR Part 740 and § 746.2 (providing information of the permitted use of license exceptions for Cuba) as well as the FAQ’s that accompanied the release of the amendments.

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Tuesday, the Chairman of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Transportation released the FY 2016 Department of Transportation, Housing and Urban Development appropriations bill which will be considered by the subcommittee tomorrow.  The legislation includes provisions which would, in essence, bar the U.S. government from recertifying any airline or cruise line if it were to include travel to Cuba.  This is one of the first attempts we have seen in Congress to try to counter President Obama’s efforts to normalize relations with Cuba.

The Cuba-related language was supported by the Chairman of the Transportation Appropriations Subcommittee, Congressman Mario Diaz-Balart (R-FL), who is a Cuban American and who strongly opposes normalization of relations between the U.S. and Cuba.

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